Scanditronix constructing new superconducting magnet

Kallamagneter 630 1 1

Scanditronix

Scanditronix in Vislanda is a leading manufacturer of magnets for particle accelerators, supplying products to research facilities, major medical companies in the field of cancer treatment, and other industries. The company’s experience, engineering know-how and long-term relationships with demanding customers, such as research facilities, has won the company an excellent reputation on the market.

Working with superconducting magnets is nothing new in our industry, but the type of magnet we’re currently developing has a design that has never been used before in accelerators.

Scanditronix is now entering a new phase of innovative technology, developing ‘cold’ superconducting magnets in an exciting collaboration project involving both academia and industry. The project aims to develop environmental-friendly and energy-efficient superconducting magnets, combining research and technical development to boost global competitiveness för Swedish companies.

Mikael Vieweg, CEO, Scanditronix, describes how the current project is breaking new ground. “Working with superconducting magnets is nothing new in our industry, but the type of magnet we’re currently developing has a design that has never been used before in accelerators. It will be less complicated, and thereby easier to manufacture than existing superconducting magnets. The CCT concept, Canted Cosine Theta, is unique.”

Academia and industry working side-by-side

A lot of preliminary work and research has been done, for example at the FREIA Laboratory at Uppsala University. Industry and academia gathered at a Big Science Sweden AIMday in 2019, where the foundation was laid for the current project*, which involves an intensive exchange of research and industrial expertise. Scanditronix is one of three companies participating, together with Uppsala University and Linnaeus University.

Uppsala University has a leading role, and is designing the magnet in collaboration with experts from CERN. Linnaeus University is producing drawings and performing calculations, and Scanditronix and the two other companies will produce the magnet.

“The process involves a continuous and rewarding exchange of knowledge and expertise,” says Mikael Vieweg. “We will make the coil and assemble the magnet. A lot of the technology will be new to us, but still within our field, so it’s a suitable project. We’re acquiring the equipment and testing new technologies in developing a functional prototype that will be delivered to CERN.”

Further interest expected from CERN and medical research

If everything goes well, and the prototype satisfies CERN’s expectations, Mikael Vieweg is optimistic that CERN will be interested in a number of similar magnets within a couple of years. He also believes that the medical market, with ion therapy systems for cancer patients, will see great advantages in a compact magnet at a lower cost.

* The project is funded by the European Regional Development Fund, Kronoberg Region and Uppsala University.

Publishing year 2021

Image: Top of the five-metre-deep thermos (vertical cryostat), which will be used to cool down the magnet prototype to –270 degrees Celsius during the tests at FREIA laboratory.