XFEL

Instrument to increase the capacity for life-science studies SFX at XFEL

Coordinating university:

University of Gothenburg, www.gu.se

Project description

The aim of the Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX) instrument is to increase the capacity for life-science studies at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EU-XFEL). To this end we have built an instrument that can run parasitically to, or independently of, the Single Particles and Biomolecules (SPB) instrument that was the first beamline constructed at the European XFEL. To accommodate a second (SFX) instrument, we refocus the XFEL beam after it passes through the SPB instrument. This is possible because the X-ray beam is essentially unaffected by the very small samples probed in the first instrument. Together, these end stations provide an invaluable resource for screening and measuring single molecules, nano- and micro-crystals, viruses and more.

Team

University of Gothenburg

  • Richard Neutze, Team leader, Prof. Dr., Deputy Head, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology

University of Hamburg

  • Henry Chapman, Prof. Dr., Division Director, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY

University of Oxford

  • James H. Naismith, Prof. Dr., Director of the Research Complex at Harwell and Director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute, Structural Biology

European XFEL

  • Adrian Mancuso, Prof. Dr., Lead Scientist of the Single Particles, Clusters, and Biomolecules and Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SPB/SFX) Instrument
  • Richard Neutze, Prof. Dr., Deputy Head, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • James H. Naismith, Prof. Dr., Director of the Research Complex at Harwell and Director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute, Structural Biology, University of Oxford, UK
  • Adrian Mancuso, Prof. Dr., Lead Scientist of the Single Particles, Clusters, and Biomolecules and Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SPB/SFX) Instrument, European XFEL, Germany

Core deliverables

In-atmosphere end station including:

  • Fixed target sample delivery system (Roadrunner) Jungfrau detector (4 Megapixels)
  • Liquid jet sample delivery system
  • Optical pump laser technology
  • In-vacuum end station including:
  • Liquid jet sample delivery system
  • AGIPD (detector), 4 Mpx and megahertz rate compatible Optical laser pump technology
  • Diagnostic tools including: Wavefront monitor
  • Intensity and position monitor(s) Spectrum monitor

Industry involvement

  • FMB Oxford, UK
  • JJ X-ray, Denmark
  • JTech, Japan
  • Pfeiffer Vacuum, Germany Suna Precision, Germany

Year

2014-2018

Total budget

EUR 20,5 million (Sweden EUR 3 million)

Collaborations

  • University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • University of Hamburg, Germany
  • University of St Andrews, UK
  • University of Oxford, UK
  • La Trobe University, Australia
  • Uppsala University, Sweden
  • Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Lund University, Sweden
  • Arizona State University, US
  • University of Lübeck, Germany
  • Diamond Light Source, UK
  • Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
  • Karolinska Institute, Sweden
  • Paul Scherrer Institute, Germany
  • NSF BioXFEL Science and Technology Center, US
  • Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport of the Slovak Republic DESY, Germany
  • Max Planck Society, Germany

Hyperlink

Procurement codes

Particle and photon detectors
Vacuum and low temperature